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3.6.1 Post-Baccalaureate Program Rigor

 

The institution’s post-baccalaureate professional degree programs, master’s and doctoral degree programs, are progressively more advanced in academic content than its undergraduate programs.

 

_X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative

 

Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary’s (MABTS) post-baccalaureate masters, professional, and doctoral degree programs are all progressively more advanced in academic content and rigor than its undergraduate programs. The process used by the institution to define content and rigor of post-baccalaureate degree programs is best understood through the school’s use of the Program Learning Outcomes Assessment Model (PLOAMs) (a five column assessment model). Column 1 demonstrates the mission of the institution and the degree program goals. Column 2 sets forth student learning outcomes (SLOs) based upon the mission and degree program goals. Column 3 represents measurable criteria by which SLOs are measured, and column 4 represents whether those SLOs were achieved or not. Column 5 looks to the future (next academic cycle) to abandon, adapt, or adopt those goals (see table 1). Each degree program is progressively more advanced in academic content as they move from acquisition, to application, and finally to analysis of content knowledge resulting in the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

The Process of Academic Content and Rigor

 

The process used by the institution to clearly define the content and rigor of post-baccalaureate degree programs begins with identification of the institutional mission and the program goal statement for masters and doctoral programs.

 

Institutional Mission and Program Goals. The stated mission of MABTS is to “to provide graduate and undergraduate theological training for effective service in church-related vocations through its main campus and designated branch campuses” [1]. This mission is expressed further in the program goal statements for the master and doctoral programs.

 

Master Level Goal Statements. The goals statements for the four master level degree programs (table 1) build upon the stated mission of the school. They focus on guiding students “to develop the ability to understand and interpret the Christian faith” and “to train students for church-related and missions vocations through effective teaching of foundational studies and by helping them to build essential skills for ministry.”

 

Program

Goal Statement

MACE

 

 

 

 

The purpose of the Master of Arts in Christian Education program is to support the educational program of Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary by guiding students to develop the ability to understand and interpret the Christian faith in the light of its biblical, theological, and historical dimensions for the effective practice of Christian education in the church, the community, and the world.

MCE

 

 

 

 

The purpose of the Master of Arts in Christian Education program is to support the educational program of Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary by guiding students to develop the ability to understand and interpret the Christian faith in the light of its biblical, theological, and historical dimensions for the effective practice of Christian education in the church, the community, and the world.

MMICS

 

 

The purpose of the Master of Divinity degree is to train students for church-related and missions vocations through effective teaching of foundational studies and by helping them to build essential skills for ministry.

MDIV

 

 

The purpose of the Master of Divinity degree is to train students for church-related and missions vocations through effective teaching of foundational studies and by helping them to build essential skills for ministry.

Table 1. Master Level Degree Program Goal Statements

 

Master Level Student Learning Outcomes. The SLOs for the four master level degree programs (table 2) build upon the goal statements of the four master programs. Examples are given of how the programs focus on the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Student Learning Outcomes Examples

MACE

 

SLO 1. To demonstrate a sufficient understanding and interpretation of the Bible for effective Christian Education Ministry.

MCE

 

SLO 4. Understand the historical development and significance of Christian and Baptist beginnings.

MMICS

 

SLO 4. That students not only learn information about the books of the Bible, but that they also gain the ability to do quality research and competent analysis on biblical topics.

MDIV

 

SLO 2. That students demonstrate a good to excellent working knowledge of the translation process for biblical Greek and Hebrew.

Table 2. Master Level Degree Student Learning Outcomes Examples

 

Master Level Assessment Criteria. The assessment criteria (content and rigor) for the four master level degree programs (table 3) build upon the SLOs of the four master programs. Examples are given of how the programs demonstrate the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Assessment Criteria (Content and Rigor)

MACE

 

Lesson Manuscripts (CE 7450). Scored by a rubric; target: rubric rows 1, 2, and 3, a score of at least 3 or higher. 

MCE

 

Church History Paper (CH 6001). Scored by a rubric. Target: rubric rows 1, 2, 3, and 4, a score of at least 3 or higher for 80% of students.

MMICS

 

 

 

In addition to regular exams, 80% of students will write papers in Old Testament Survey and New Testament Survey demonstrating a good to excellent comprehension and analysis of their topic as graded 4the rubric for research papers. Artifact 1: OT research paper.

MDIV

 

 

 

In addition to quizzes, daily work, and examinations, students will do translation projects in Greek III and in Hebrew II demonstrating a good to excellent (3-4) understanding of the translation process as graded by column 4 (translation ability) of the rubric for biblical languages. Artifact 1: Greek III project.

Table 3. Master Level Degree Assessment Criteria Examples

 

Master Level Assessment Results. The assessment results (artifacts) for the four master level degree programs (table 4) build upon the assessment criteria of the four master programs. These results (artifacts) are reviewed at the end of each semester through peer review (inside/outside department) through the use of rubrics for papers and projects [2]. Examples are given of how the programs progress in academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Assessment Results (Artifacts)

MACE

For rubric rows 1, 2, and 3, the student(s) score was less than 3.

MCE

Target not met; for rubric rows 3 and 4, less than 80% of students scored a 3 or higher.

MMICS

 

Scored by a rubric. NT artifact target not met in rows 1 and 3 but met in rows 2 and 4.  OT artifact target not met in rows 2, 3, 4.

MDIV

 

 

Artifact 1: Greek III project - *DPR: Average for column 4 = 3.30 with 12 of 13 scoring good to excellent. *OPR: Average for column 4 = 2.92 with 8 of 13 scoring good to excellent.

Table 4. Master Level Degree Assessment Results Examples

 

Master Level Use of Results. The use of results (column 5) for the four master level degree programs (table 5) project content and rigor for the upcoming academic year where SLOs are abandoned, adapted, or adopted for departmental use. Examples are given of how the programs focus on future use of SLOs for the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Use of Results (Future SLOs)

MACE

 

Professor will spend more class time on the development of the lesson manuscript’s length, and how to integrate hermeneutical principles in the formation of a Bible lesson.

MCE

 

Professors will introduce rubric and spend teaching time on evaluating and interacting with sources to identify the historical development of Baptist beginnings.

MMICS

 

The professor will integrate teaching on how to organize a paper as well as find proper source work. 

MDIV

 

 

Artifact 1: A majority of students scored good to excellent. The rubric for biblical languages will be distributed with the syllabus in order to continue communicating the requirements to the students.

Table 5. Master Level Degree Assessment Results Examples

 

The process used by the institution clearly defines content and rigor of master degree programs through the use of the PLOAM model. This model is also used in the post-baccalaureate doctoral programs.

 

Doctoral Level Goal Statements. The goals statements for the two doctoral level degree programs (DMin, PhD) (table 6) build upon the stated mission of the school. They focus on guiding students “to combine theory and significant experience” through the “integrat[ion] [of] the classical disciplines of biblical, historical, theological, social, and linguistic studies.” Further, they equip students “for advanced scholarship, independent research, effective teaching, and service in Christian ministry.”

 

Program

Goal Statement

DMin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The purpose of the Doctor of Ministry degree is to build on the general theological preparation of the Master of Divinity, Master of Missiology or Master of Christian Education degrees and moves toward a concentration that combines theory and significant experience. The professional character of the degree is designed to prepare students to be effective in the practice of ministry rather than preparing for research and teaching vocations.

 

The program of study integrates the classical disciplines of biblical, historical, theological, social, and linguistic studies with those significant tasks of one involved in the practice of ministry. It assists those whose responsibilities range broadly in pastoral, missionary, or administrative ministries by enhancing both competency and excellence in the practice of ministry.

PhD

 

 

The Doctor of Philosophy Program supports the educational program of Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary by equipping students for advanced scholarship, independent research, effective teaching, and service in Christian ministry.

Table 6. Doctoral Level Degree Program Goal Statements

 

Doctoral Level Student Learning Outcomes. The SLOs for the two doctoral level degree programs (table 7) build upon the goal statements of the two doctoral programs. Examples are given of how the programs focus on the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Student Learning Outcomes Examples

DMin

 

SLO 2. Students will demonstrate an ability to synthesize the body of literature pertinent to their major field.

PhD

 

 

SLO 4. Students will demonstrate a thorough acquaintance with literature in their area of specialization—especially the ability to summarize, analyze, critique, and apply journal articles published in their major field.

Table 7. Doctoral Level Degree Student Learning Outcomes Examples

 

Doctoral Level Assessment Criteria. The assessment criteria (content and rigor) for the two doctoral level degree programs (table 8) build upon the SLOs of the two doctoral programs. Examples are given of how the programs focus on the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Assessment Criteria (Content and Rigor)

DMin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Major project in a capstone experience

 

This component of the degree may take the form of either:

 

1)    A ministry project that focuses on improving a specific ministry of a local church (100-150 pages); or

2)    A research project that produces a manuscript in the area of applied theology, ministry theory, and ministry practice that makes a contribution to the literature in the field (125-150 pages).

 

The major project is supervised by the DMin Committee as well as a faculty advisor. Prior to the beginning of the major project, the student must obtain approval of the proposal. To obtain this approval, the student must submit a project prospectus to the faculty advisor, who upon approval forwards the prospectus to the DMin Committee. Once the Committee approves the prospectus, the student may begin research and writing.

 

After the advisor approves the finished project: 1) the Dean of the DMin program forwards the project to 2 (two) external readers; 2) the Dean of the DMin program, after taking into consideration the comments of the external readers grants final approval to the project.

 

Artifact: Major project

 

Rubric: At least 80% of students will score in the Exemplary range. Up to 20% of students may score in the good range.

PhD

 

 

 

 

 

 

4a. DR 9945 Supervised Departmental Reading.

Target: 75% rate "Excellent" or "Good" on criteria on the evaluation rubric (composite score)

 

4b. PhD Dissertation

Target: 75% rate "Good” or "Excellent" on Rubric for PhD Dissertation, Quality of Research (Elements 1-2) criteria

Table 8. Doctoral Level Degree Assessment Criteria Examples

 

Doctoral Level Assessment Results. The assessment results (artifacts) for the two doctoral level degree programs (table 9) build upon the assessment criteria of the two doctoral programs. These results (artifacts) are reviewed at the end of each semester through peer review (inside/outside department) through the use of rubrics for papers and projects [2]. Examples are given of how the programs focus on the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Assessment Results (Artifacts)

DMin

 

One student completed the major project, scoring 10 out of 12 points (exemplary). Target met.

PhD

 

 

 

 

 

 

4a. DR 9945 Supervised Departmental Reading.

100% rated "Excellent" or "Good" on the evaluation rubric composite score. Target met.

 

4b. 100% rated "Good” or "Excellent" on Rubric for PhD Dissertation, Quality of Research (Elements 1) criterion, and 71% rated "Good" or "Excellent" on (Element 2) criterion. With the limited data pool (only 7 students), no significant statistical difference seems to exist between 71% and 75%. Target met for both criteria.

Table 9. Doctoral Level Degree Assessment Results Examples

 

Doctoral Level Use of Results. The use of results (column 5) for the two doctoral level degree programs (table 10) project content and rigor for the upcoming academic year where SLOs are abandoned, adapted, or adopted for departmental use. Examples are given of how the programs focus on future use of SLOs for the progression of academic rigor (figure 1).

 

Program

Use of Results (Future SLOs)

DMin

 

While the student did well, for better clarification, the DMin Committee will distribute rubric requirements to future doctoral candidates upon completion of the final seminar.

PhD

 

 

 

 

4a.-b. All students met the goal for this PLO, but the PhD Office will continue to monitor diligently this important PLO. The following actions will be taken this year: (1) The PhD Office will review the requirements for the DR 9945 to ensure proper emphasis is being placed on journal articles. (2) The PhD Office will send a reminder of this and other PhD Program Learning Outcomes to all faculty.

Table 10. Doctoral Level Degree Assessment Results Examples

 

The Progression of Academic Content and Rigor

 

The progression of academic content and rigor can be seen through the differing foci of content knowledge between academic levels. The increasing rigor from undergraduate to post-baccalaureate to doctoral course content, as evidenced in four main areas of study (Bible, Theology, History, and Research) are demonstrated.

 

Distinction Between Programs. The progression of academic rigor in relation to content knowledge is refocused from program to program. At the undergraduate level, students focus on the acquisition of content knowledge as they acquire knowledge as apprentices. As they matriculate to the master level programs, the emphasis shifts from the acquisition to application of content knowledge, wherein students transition into fields of service as practitioners. Finally, as students enter doctoral level programs, the priority centers upon analysis of content knowledge as students engage subject matter as research scholars (figure 1).

The undergraduate degree programs at MABTS are separate and distinct from the master degree programs in both design and content [3]. Undergraduate degree programs are not open to students in the master degree programs and may not be used to satisfy any of the requirements for the Master of Divinity degree, the Master of Arts in Christian Education degree, Master of Christian Education degree, or the Master of Missiology and Intercultural Studies degree.

 

Courses offered at the master level and at the doctoral level are separate and distinct. Master-level students are not allowed to enroll in doctoral seminars.

 

Doctoral students are not allowed to take master-level courses for credit to fulfill requirements for doctoral seminars. Doctoral students are allowed to audit or to take for credit master-level courses for remedial purposes or for their personal edification.

 

The 2014-15 MABTS Catalog demonstrates clearly that master programs and doctoral programs are distinct and build upon an earlier degree earned and are more advanced in content and intensity than undergraduate programs [3].

 

Admission and Continuance. MABTS maintains seminary-wide minimum standards for admission to all of its programs [4]. For admission to the master program, applicants must have graduated from an accredited college or university with a bachelor degree or equivalent with a grade point average of at least a C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale). In addition, individual programs are allowed to set higher standards for admission and continuation. Admission to doctoral programs requires a Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university and a Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 in their masters work. Those applying for the Doctor of Ministry degree must have completed at least two years of ministry experience. For all majors in the Doctor of Philosophy degree, applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of biblical Greek and six semester hours of biblical Hebrew. Biblical language requirements are higher for applicants for Old Testament and New Testament majors. Other requirements for admission into the PhD Program are outlined in the MABTS Catalog. Doctor of Ministry and Doctor of Philosophy students must maintain a higher GPA (minimum 3.0 or B) than undergraduate and master level students to avoid probation and termination from the programs.

 

Master Degree Program Requirements. Each student in the Master of Divinity (MDiv), Master of Missiology and Intercultural Studies (MMICS), and Master of Christian Education (MCE) degree programs must complete ninety semester hours of coursework as specified in the Catalog [5]. The program includes two components: (1) seventy-eight hours of required courses and (2) twelve semester hours of elective courses. Students in the MMICS program may complete the last thirty hours of their work during a two year period through advanced courses completed on the field while the student serves a two-year cross-cultural missionary appointment.

 

The Master of Divinity program includes two components: (1) seventy-eight hours of required courses and (2) twelve semester hours of elective courses [6]. Each student in the Master of Arts in Christian Education (MACE) program must complete sixty semester hours of courses as specified in the catalog, including fifty-four semester hours of required courses and six elective hours [7].

 

In addition to the course requirements, students in all degree programs are required to be involved in practical ministry application through the seminary’s practical missions program. The Student Learning Assessment is also required. A written learning assessment is given to students during their last semester to gauge the scope of learning during the course of a degree. The assessment covers topics that are degree specific and while no academic credit is awarded in conjunction with the assessment, it is a graduation requirement. The office of Campus Life administers the assessment and will contact graduates during their final semester regarding the assessment date [8].

 

Professional Doctoral Degree Requirements. MABTS offers one professional-type doctorate degree, the Doctor of Ministry degree [9]. This professional degree maintains standards that are consistent with MABTS and of the accrediting body. Three majors are offered in the Doctor of Ministry program: practical theology, missiology, and Christian education. The DMin degree is thirty-two semester hours. These hours consist of twenty-six hours of course work and a supervised ministry or research project called the major project. After the satisfactory completion of all seminars, the student will participate in written examinations, which cover each of the seminars taken. In addition, after the submission and completion of the ministry project or research project, the student must present and orally defend the project. This professional and creative presentation is considered a major component in the overall grade of the project.

 

Research Doctoral Degree Requirements. Requirements for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy Program are outlined above but include a bachelor degree from a college or university, a 90 hour Master of Divinity degree from a seminary or college, a minimum grade point average of 3.0, and study of the biblical languages of Hebrew and Greek [10]. The PhD degree is sixty-four semester hours beyond the master degree. It consists of coursework (eight four hour seminars, Graduate Research and Writing, Graduate Teaching, Supervised Departmental Reading, Supervised Instruction), comprehensive written examinations, a dissertation, and an oral defense of the dissertation. Additionally, PhD students must demonstrate through testing or coursework a working knowledge of two research languages (German and Latin or German and French). Instead of the two research languages, candidates for the PhD in education must have a working knowledge of empirical research methodologies. They may complete this requirement by course work or testing. Doctoral colloquia and practical experience are also required. PhD students must successfully complete all seminars and other coursework and pass comprehensive examinations to qualify for candidacy status. Only after achieving candidacy status may students officially receive permission from the PhD Committee to work on the dissertation. Students are allowed seven years to complete the Doctor of Philosophy degree and must be continuously enrolled throughout the program.

           

Course Numbering System. Courses are identified by prefixes and numbers [11]. MABTS’s numbering system is: 2000-4000 level are undergraduate courses; 5000-7000 level are master level courses; 8000 level courses are professional doctorate (Doctor of Ministry); and 9000 level courses are Doctor of Philosophy. Courses at the 5000 to 9000 level are considered graduate and professional with the highest numbers designating progressively more advanced courses (e.g., Doctor of Philosophy seminars and requirements are 9000 level).

 

The distribution of hours among 2000-4000 (undergraduate), 5000-7000, 8000, and 9000 level courses are determined by the seminary and the various departments. Only courses numbered 5000 and above are normally to be taken by graduate students. At MABTS, graduate students are not permitted to take undergraduate courses to fulfill requirements for their graduate degree: “Undergraduate degree programs are not open to students in the master degree programs and may not be used to satisfy any of the requirements for the Master of Divinity degree, the Master of Arts in Christian Education degree, Master of Christian Education degree, or the Master of Missiology and Intercultural Studies degree” [12].

 

Course Syllabi. The 2014-15 Employee Handbook specifies the policy on course syllabi [13]. These documents are to demonstrate a clear differentiation between program levels. Course syllabi illustrate that MABTS’s post-baccalaureate professional degree program as well as its master and doctoral degree programs are progressively more advanced in academic content and rigor than undergraduate programs and are consistent with the expectation of higher education institutions.

 

As described in the 2014-15 Employee Handbook, faculty members are responsible for submitting a syllabus for each course they will teach during the semester to the department chairman. This submission is due one month prior to the beginning of each semester. After approval by the department chairman, syllabi are forwarded to the Academic Vice President’s Office for approval. The syllabus should contain an overview of the nature and purpose of the course, course requirements and measurable objectives, grading procedure, a bibliography, all of which correspond to the approved syllabus template [14]. Procedures for grade assessment are clearly stated in the sample syllabus under “Course Requirements.” This section indicates the procedures that will be used to evaluate students and make it possible to discern the approximate weight of each grade component. All syllabi also include the MABTS grading scale and the policy regarding late work. A sample syllabus showing required elements is published in the 2014-15 Employee Handbook. Under “MABTS Syllabus Guidelines,” the Employee Handbook states that faculty should “demonstrate a clear difference in requirements” for degree levels and provides sample guidelines for reading assignments for different degree levels [15]. Samples of course syllabi evidence the different academic requirements for different degree levels [16].

 

The degree programs at MABTS demonstrate advancement of course content and rigor [16]. Reading and course requirements shown in each level of programming (bachelor, master, and doctoral) in selected areas of study (Bible, Theology, History, Research) are progressively more rigorous. A sampling of the progression of the advancement of content and rigor for the forty bachelors classes, the thirty masters classes, and the eight doctoral seminars are exhibited in table 11 below.

 

Degree Program

Bible

Theology

History

Research

BACS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course: OT 2101

 

Instructor: Akers

 

 

# Texts: 2

 

# Pages: 256

 

Assignments:  Paper (10 pages)

 

Course: TH 3701

 

Instructor: Millikin

 

# Texts: 1

 

# Pages: 460

 

Assignments: Paper (10 pages)

 

 

Course: CH 3001

 

Instructor: Gillham

 

# Texts: 2

 

# Pages: 848

 

Assignments: Two Reading Reports

 

 

Course: EN 4913

 

Instructor: Smith

 

 

# Texts: 2

 

# Pages: 464

 

Assignments: Research Paper (10 pages)

MDiv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course: OT 5101

 

Instructor: Kilpatrick

 

# Texts: 3

 

# Pages: 880

 

Assignments: Paper (15 pages)

 

 

Course: TH 6702

 

Instructor: Christian

 

# Texts: 4

 

# Pages: 1139

 

Assignments:  Paper (15 pages)

 

 

Course: CH 6001

 

Instructor: Hynes

 

 

# Texts: 2

 

# Pages: 1088

 

Assignments: Book Critique, Paper (15 pages)

Course: EN 7900

 

Instructor: Smith

 

 

# Texts: 5

 

# Pages: 1256

 

Assignments: Paper (15 pages)

 

PhD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course: OT 9131

 

Instructor: Miller

 

 

# Texts: 3

 

# Pages: 2000

 

Assignments: Research Paper (30 pages), Annotated Bibliography, Weekly Research Reports, Seminar Translation and Notebook

 

Course: TH 9750

 

Instructor: Mahony

 

 

# Texts: 4

 

# Pages: 2000

 

Assignments:  Paper (40 pages), Oral Presentation, 4 Book Reviews, Weekly Presentations

 

 

 

 

Course: CH 9571

 

Instructor: Spradlin

 

 

# Texts: 7

 

# Pages: 2000

 

Assignments: Conduct Colloquium, Journal Article Review, Research Paper (35 pages)

 

 

 

Course: DR 9910

 

Instructor: Bickley/Hickman

 

# Texts: 3

 

# Pages: 850

 

Assignments: Paper (10 pages)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 11. Advancement of Content and Rigor

 

Program and Course Approval Process. Proposals for new graduate degree programs are reviewed at multiple levels (Academic Vice President, Academic Council, academic program deans and the program committees, and faculty) to ensure that they meet the standards and mission for graduate education at MABTS [17]. All courses that form the basis of the curriculum must be approved by the various departments, the academic program deans and the program committees (Masters and Undergraduate, Doctor of Ministry, Doctor of Philosophy), the Academic Vice President, the Academic Council, and the faculty. The Academic Council makes recommendations to the President and to the faculty through the Academic Vice President on academic matters (including new programs) and curriculum development. Graduate program content is reviewed annually by the departments and program deans.

 

Faculty Credentials. The standard credential for teaching graduate courses (master or doctoral) at MABTS is a terminal degree in the teaching discipline. The standard credential for teaching undergraduate courses (associate or bachelor) is a masters or terminal degree in the teaching discipline. Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) must have 18 graduate semester hours of earned coursework at the terminal, doctoral level in the teaching discipline, under the direct supervision of a professor of record [18].

 

Documentation

 

1. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 8

2. MABTS Paper and Project Rubrics

3. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 89

4. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 44-49, 168-170, 172, 182-186, 194

5. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 122-123, 126-130, 132-134, 136-140

6. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 122

7. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 132-134

8. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 72-73

9. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 167-171

10. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 186-194

11. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 91

12. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 89

13. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 66-67, 84-96

14. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 87-100

15. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 85-86

16. Sample Syllabus Packet

17. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook p. 22, 39-43

18. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 52-53

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