Connected Campus

2.9 Learning Resources and Services

 

The institution, through ownership or formal arrangements or agreements, provides and supports student and faculty access and user privileges to adequate library collections and services and to other learning/information resources consistent with the degrees offered.  Collections, resources, and services are sufficient to support all its educational, research, and public service programs.

 

_X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative

 

Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary (MABTS) provides sufficient and accessible resources to support the mission of the institution. The seminary offers student, faculty, staff, administration, and community users access to The Ora Byram Allison Memorial Library (hereafter referred to as the Library). The seminary dedicated the Library in August 1979, as its academic core. The Library is committed to the mission of the seminary by developing, providing, and maintaining facilities, materials, and services for all degree programs. The Library extends those materials and services to the entire seminary community—students, faculty, staff, alumni, local Southern Baptist pastors, and missionaries on furlough. Furthermore, the Library offers many of its collections and services, in a limited fashion, as prescribed in written, formal agreements, to students and faculty of area institutions. Located on the western wing of the seminary, the Library includes a spacious circulation and browsing area, periodical room, The Roy O. Beaman Reference Room, study rooms and area, and the Reading Room with Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) (see Comprehensive Standard 3.8.1 for a detailed account of the Library’s physical layout).

 

The institution, through ownership or formal arrangements or agreements, provides and supports student and faculty access and user privileges to adequate library collections as well as to other learning/information resources consistent with the degrees offered. These collections and resources are sufficient to support all its educational, research, and public service programs in the Seminary’s two libraries: the Ora Byram Memorial Library and the Northeast Branch Campus Library. 

 

The Ora Byram Allison Memorial Library

 

The Library of MABTS possesses and reflects a long, uniform, and rich history in meeting a variety of needs for the constituency of the seminary. From the seminary’s beginning, when faculty members such as Drs. Gray Allison, Roy Beaman, and Phillip Allison donated their entire personal libraries to establish the initial Library for the school, to the present, when the seminary funds and oversees the daily activities of the Library through the office of the Director of Library Services, MABTS has maintained a conscientious effort to establish, maintain, and enrich this critical component of the entire academic community. A measure of this emphasis by the Administration comes in the address each August in the opening, Monday evening session of Founders’ Days by Dr. B. Gray Allison, President Emeritus, when he highlights the crucial role of the Library from the beginning in the seminary’s development and operation [1]. Graduating classes, as demonstrated in the Library Exit Surveys (LES) of 2013-14 [2] and 2014-15 [3], express praise, even citing staff members by names and positions of service.

 

Structure of Services. The Library’s structure of operations and responsibilities meets the educational, research, and public service needs of its users, including Internet access and the seminary's website. The Library operates and maintains 24 OPAC computers (see Comprehensive Standard 3.8.1), and provides interlibrary loan service for students, faculty, and staff through the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC). This service meets faculty and student needs for general studies and doctoral research, as documented in the Library’s Annual Reports for 2013-14 [4] and 2014-15 [5] and is made accessible to users on the Library’s website [6], also explained in the Library instructional videos [7].

 

The Library staff meets the needs of users throughout the academic year, as planned in their annual Administrative Unit Goals (AUGs) for 2013-14 [8] and 2014-15 [9]. Moreover, the Director of Library Services directs all activities in the Library and reports regularly to the administration and faculty [10]. The Library maintains the copying of materials, usually periodicals, for all faculty upon request and carefully purchased their book/journal requests in the academic years of 2013-14 [11] and 2014-15 [12]. Students, faculty, and staff gave the Library staff affirmation through annual survey responses for 2013-14 [13] and 2014-15 [14]. They also demonstrated respect, confidence, and gratitude in the LES surveys for 2013-14 [2] and 2014-15 [3] (see Comprehensive Standard 3.8.3, document regarding the Library staff).

 

Access to the Library’s collections is a critical component in the successful navigation of study and research. The Library makes available its resources in a timely method and its webpage lists times of operations and closings [15]. Furthermore, The Student’s Guide to the Ora Byram Allison Memorial Library communicates to all new students in each degree program facets of its operations, services, assistance, physical layout, scope of collections, area-library names and telephone numbers, and other information, including hours of operation and/or special closings [16].

 

Access of Services. The Library carefully structures its holdings and services to maximize usage of items for the seminary community. Library hours accommodate research and reading needs for users, and during the academic year, the Library is open 76 hours per week. During the summer break, the Library is open 42.5, unless a summer teacher requests an extension for a class. These hours are displayed on the Library’s website [15] and on OPAC [17]. Full-time Library staff are available for primary study time from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. During evening hours, student employees, who are fully trained and conversant with computer programs, printing processes, circulation procedures, and basic research, serve as demonstrated in the Annual Reports for 2013-14 [18] and 2014-15 [19].

 

For all faculty and students, both residential and distance learning [20], the Library's online resources and Internet access are convenient (see table 3 below). For anyone off campus and without immediate access to a Library staff member, the Library urges users to view the instructional videos for brief introductions and guides to the Library’s materials [21]. Various Internet websites the Library promotes are available, including Tennessee Electric Library (TEL) which provides 68 databases of full text journal and bibliographic content [22].

 

Adequacy of Services. The Library uses a collection development policy [23] as both blueprint and guide, lending support to the educational, research, and services needs of the seminary. At the conclusion of the 2014-2015 academic year, the Library's holdings included: 

 

  • Materials (monographs, including E copy, microforms, CDs, and DVDs) owned in 2013-14: 166.4 and in 2014-15: 173.9 [24]
  • Journals (current subscriptions): In 2013-14 and 2014-15, we subscribed to 4,300 journals [25]
  • Materials circulated: 2013-14: 52,376 and in 2014-15: 45,520 [26]
  • Journals circulated: 2013-14: 36,795 and in 2014-15: 42,819 [27]
  • Interlibrary Loans: 2013-14: Outgoing – 135, Incoming – 5 and in 2014-15: Outgoing 120, Incoming 4 [28]

             

The Library borrows few materials, vis-à-vis the number of items that it lends to other institutions. Following the guidelines of the Library’s Collection Development Policy [23], the Library has purchased relevant titles that faculty and students have requested, adding to the depth and extent of its collections in various fields across degree programs. Two outstanding examples of directed growth appear in the 2013-14 academic year [11]. Most of the 211 faculty requests (see table 1) came as a result of the new biblical counseling track, while in the 2014-15 academic year [12] a substantial increase in education titles came as a result of a doctoral student’s suggestion for that discipline (see materials growth from Library’s Annual Reports, 2013-14 [29] and 2014-15 [30]).

 

Requestor

Added 2013-2014

Added 2014-2015

Library overall

1,704

7,595

Faculty

211

96

Student

33

83

Table 1. Materials Requested and Added

 

Appropriate Services. The Library provides appropriate services through staffing, reference assistance work with users, hours of operation, purchases, additions, maintenance, and various duties and operations. This is also evidenced through annual faculty and student surveys (see below), the LES for May and December each year, which reflect widespread satisfaction with Library’s holdings and its expansion of materials via acquisitions. Faculty and students overwhelmingly affirm the Library’s collections and procurement of traditional print and E-copies to support all educational programs in 1) books, 2) journals, and 3) databases, as indicated in the annual surveys for 2013-14 [31] and 2014-15 [32] and LES for 2013-14 [33] and 2014-15 [34]. 

 

Student Survey Questions, 2013-14:

           

            General

·      #77 – The library’s book collection meets my study needs.

·      #78 – The library’s periodical collection meets my needs

·      #79 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

 

PhD

·      #66 – The library’s book collection meets my study needs

·      #67 – The library’s periodical collection meets my study needs

·      #70 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

 

DMin

·      #42 – The Library’s book collection meets my study needs

·      #43 – The library’s periodical collection meets my study needs.

·      #47 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

 

Faculty Survey Questions, 2013-14:

 

·      #51 – The library periodical collection is sufficient to support student research that I direct.

·      #52 – The general book collection is sufficient for my teaching and research needs.

·      #57 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

 

LES Questions, 2013-14:

 

·      #4 – I found the book materials in the library to be pertinent to my studies

·      #5 – I found the journals/periodical collection to be helpful in my studies

·      #7 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies

·      #8 – As an Online/Distance Learning student, I found the Library was able to supply me with the resources I needed, be them in traditional book format or through online resources.

 

Student Survey Questions, 2014-15:

 

            General

·      #83 – The library’s book collection meets my study needs.

·      #84 – The library’s periodical collection meets my needs

·      #85 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

PhD

·      #66 – The library’s book collection meets my study needs

·      #67 – The library’s periodical collection meets my study needs

·      #70 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

            DMin

·      #43 – The Library’s book collection meets my study needs

·      #44 – The library’s periodical collection meets my study needs.

·      #48 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

 

Faculty Survey Questions, 2014-15:

 

·      #51 – The library periodical collection is sufficient to support student research that I direct.

·      #52 – The general book collection is sufficient for my teaching and research needs.

·      #57 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies.

 

LES Questions, 2014-15:

 

·      #4 – I found the book materials in the library to be pertinent to my studies

·      #5 – I found the journals/periodical collection to be helpful in my studies

·      #7 – I found the databases to be a valuable source of current information to my studies

·      #8 – As an Online/Distance Learning student, I found the Library was able to supply me with the resources I needed, be they in traditional book format or through online resources.

 

Besides the positive scores given above, the LES captures many positive comments from all graduating students. See, for example, the 2013-14 comments, [2] as well as the 2014-15 [3].

 

Appropriate Resources. The following table demonstrates the Library’s current holdings for materials and circulation in comparison with three different groups:

 

·      GROUP 1—Other  theological libraries in the immediate area—Memphis: Harding Graduate School of Religion (Harding) and Memphis Theological Seminary (MTS)

 

·      GROUP 2—Other  theological libraries in an extended area—Tennessee: Emmanuel School of Religion (Emmanuel) and Vanderbilt Divinity School (Vanderbilt)

 

·      GROUP 3—Other theological libraries in the denomination—the Southern Baptist Convention: Golden Gate Baptist Theological (Golden Gate) and Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (Midwestern).

 

Note: the data from MABTS is from the Library’s 2013-14 and 2014-15 Annual Reports and the data from other schools may be found in the Summary of Proceedings: Sixty-Seventh Annual Conference of the American Theological Library Association, edited by Tawny Burgess, ATLA, Chicago: Illinois, 2013, pp. 451-54, Appendix VII, Library Statistics (2012-2013). More statistical information is at http://www.atla.com/Members/benefits/statistics/Pages/default.aspx.

 

Survey Groups

Questions

2013-14 Results %

2014-15 Results %

Students:

·       General

 

 

 

·       PhD

 

 

 

·       DMin

 

 

 

               13-14  14-15

Questions  77        83        

                  78        84

                  79        85

 

Questions  66        66

                  67        67

                  70        70

 

Questions  42        43

                  43        44

                  47        48

 

Strong Agree/Agree

83.75

82.50

81.75

 

90.47

90.47

100

 

62.50 (12.50 neutral)

87.50

62.50 (37.50 neutral)

 

Strong Agree/Agree

88.57

84.34

84.34

 

91.67

100

100

 

75 (25% neutral)

75 (25% neutral)

100

 

Faculty

 

 

Questions  51        51

                  52        52

                  57        57

94.74

100

89.47 (10.53 neutral)

86.67

86.67

86.67

LES (Library Exit Survey—Graduating Students)

 

 

 

 

Questions  4          4

                  5          5

                  7          7 

                  8          8

 

 

83.5

91.5

84.2

39.4 (61.6 did not take distance learning)

100 for those enrolled

81.15

65.21 (30.43 % neutral)

72.46 (27.53 % neutral)

39.13 (53.62 % neutral or did not take distance learning)

Table 2. Survey Instruments and Results concerning the Library’s Collections

           

These statistics reveal several insights concerning the strengths of the Library. First, it is apparent that the Library compares favorably with similar institutions. Second, the Library leads in certain categories such as subscriptions for periodical literature and the ratio of items sent and borrowed on inter-library loan. Third, the Library compiles a very brisk circulation pace, meeting the needs of both faculty and students. Tables 3.1-3.3 (below) illustrate various areas of comparison between MABTS and other institutions.

 

School

Students

Faculty

Library Staff FTE

Total Library Staff

Distance Learning

Circulation

PhD. Program

Volumes

Journals

eBooks

Items Added

ILL Sent

ILL Rec.

MABTS  13-14

302

17

2

8

Yes

52,376

Yes

166,383

818

29,000

1,704

135

5

MABTS  14-15

289

17

2

7

Yes

NA

Yes

173,978

709

5,523

(Jan)

7,595

120

4

Harding

13-14

138

10

4

5

No

7,425

No

117,653

446

19,444

1,482

890

92

MTS 13-14

293

12.8

3

4

Yes

4,923

No

68,324

336

16,347

264

245

103

Table 3.1 Other Theological Libraries in the Immediate Area - Memphis

 

School

Students

Faculty

Library Staff FTE

Total Library Staff

Distance Learning

Circulation

PhD. Program

Volumes

Journals

eBooks

Items Added

ILL Sent

ILL Rec.

MABTS  13-14

302

17

2

8

Yes

52,376

Yes

166,383

818

29,000

1,704

135

5

MABTS  14-15

289

17

2

8

Yes

NA

Yes

173,978

709

5,523 (Jan)

7,595

120

4

Emmanuel

13-14

124

10.4

2

4

Yes

13,538

Yes

123,151

183

14,104

0

229

229

Vanderbilt

13-14

242

44

7

12

No

23,016

No

228,423

277

128,765

3,584

2,650

2,650

Table 3.2 Other Theological Libraries in the State

 

School

Students

Faculty

Library Staff FTE

Total Library Staff

Distance Learning

Circulation

PhD. Program

Volumes

Journals

eBooks

Items Added

ILL Sent

ILL Rec.

MABTS 

13-14

302

17

2

8

Yes

52,376

Yes

166,383

818

29,000

1,704

135

5

MABTS 

14-15

289

17

2

8

Yes

NA

Yes

173,978

709

5,523 (Jan)

7,595

120

4

Golden Gate 13-14

242

34.66

8

11

Yes

23,483

Yes

166,828

325

80,994

1,878

1,343

645

Mid-Western 13-14

672

25.95

4

8

Yes

11,408

Yes

125,543

371

60,202

11,010

1,022

1,675

Table 3.3 Other Theological Libraries in the Denomination – SBC

 

The Library expresses the greatest confidence providing adequate resources to the seminary as an entity, and fulfills its obligations for all educational, research, and public service programs and activities.

 

Off-Campus and Distance Learning Access. Students, regardless of location, have access to all of the Library’s holdings via OPAC, as well as the listing of journal items on the Library’s website. These titles are readily available for residential students and the Library makes all such titles accessible to distance learning students upon their request. The Library has aggressively sought to identify and purchase a greater number of E-copy/materials, which are of particular interest to distance learning students. The Library has collected both monographs and serials in E-format and has subscribed to over 800 serial titles in print in both 2013-14 [35] and 2014-15 [36], along with holding many out-of-print journals for research [37]. Table 4 below outlines acquisitions, such as book materials [38], journal resources [39], and online aids [22] that SACSCOC has deemed appropriate [40].

 

For distance learning students, the Library enrolled in ATLA’s pilot program in November 2014 [41] for distance borrowing—ATLA Reciprocal Borrowing Program. Joining another thirty plus institutions around the United States, the Library adopted the Guidelines and Agreement Draft of October 30, 2014, permitting visiting distance students to use the Library while MABTS students received the same privileges to the other reciprocal schools [42]. All Library users within proximity to the Cordova Campus have reciprocal borrowing/user privileges with local institutions enrolled in the MALC cooperative agreement [43].

 

Access to Outside Resources. In examining holdings and ownership beyond the seminary, the Library continues formal agreements with other agencies. The Library has been a member of OCLC for over three decades and interacts with international support in its use of interlibrary loans (ILL) [6]. Also, the Library acquires the American Theological Library Association (ATLA) Indexes through Elton B. Stephens Company (EBSCOHOST) and the electronic version of The Southern Baptist Periodical Index as a direct online subscription. These vital tools are available to all students and alumni [37]. MABTS is an institutional member of ATLA and the journal department of the Library augments its collection by retrieving periodicals through ATLA’s Serial Exchange (ASE) resource (see the Library’s acquisitions of such periodical issues from 2013-14 [44] and 2014-15 [45]).

 

Online Product

Description

# of Titles

Historical Monograph Collection

 

 

 

 

 

The American Theological Library Association (ATLA) Historical Monographs Collection consists of two Series focused on religion and theology. The collection represents a core collection for colleges and universities with programs in history, theology, religion, sociology, political science and other disciplines.

29,000 +

Over 10 million pages

 

 

 

 

 

eBook Religion Collection*

(begins 7/1/14)

 

EBSCO’s new and expanding database of religious monographs

 

5,600+ from over 150 religious publishing houses

ATLAS

 

 

 

 

American Theological Library Association Serials - Index to journal articles, book reviews, and collections of essays in all fields of religion with ATLA's online collection of major religion and theology journals. (ATLA Index plus on-line articles with full text).

300+ full text

 

 

 

 

Academic Search Elite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EBSCO’s Index of scholarly journals in the social sciences, humanities, general science, education and multicultural studies. PDF content dating back as far as 1985.

 

 

 

 

13,600 indexed and abstracted journals

2,300 full text journals

12,000 peer-reviewed, indexed and abstracted journals

1,800 peer-reviewed, full-text journals

SBPI

 

 

 

The SBPI is a cumulative cover-to-cover index to periodicals issued each year by historically Southern Baptist Convention-related agencies, institutions, and associations at the national level of organization.

30-50 journals

 

 

 

Online Resources Menu Tab

 

Provides for online links to various websites, E Journals, news, videos, and missions.

Of special note is TEL—Tennessee Electronic Library

62

 

68

Table 4. Online Resources Available for Traditional and Distance Learning Students

           

Relevant Resources for Academic Programming. The Library shares its resources in formal, reciprocal agreements with other academic libraries and resource centers in the area via the Memphis Area Library Council (MALC) [43, 46]. These resources may be accessed on MABTS’s website for students, faculty, and staff. They include two theological seminary libraries, one county library, and seven college/university libraries.

 

Northeast Campus Library

 

The Northeast Campus Library (NCL) provides a circulation area with access to the shared online catalog of the Ora Byram Allison Memorial Library; study areas; displays of newly acquired books and audio-visual resources; a computer lab; and a small lounge area. 

 

Structure of Services. The NCL operates and maintains five computers with OPAC access and provides wireless Internet access for students, staff, faculty, and visiting library patrons. All computers in the computer lab include Bible Soft’s PC Study Bible and the NCL provides interlibrary loan services both through the Main Campus Library and through the Capital District Library Council (CDLC). On the rare occasions when a resource is not available from these sources, the CDLC provides assistance in attaining it through other library systems. 

 

Incoming students receive a printed guide (updated yearly) to the NCL, as well as a tour of the library that includes information about library policies, the components of the library’s collection, and instruction for accessing resources. A guide to online resources, including journal articles, is also available to library users. 

 

Access of Services. Students may use the library during the seminary’s regular hours of operation, Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Arrangements may also be made with the Library Director or the library clerk if additional access times are needed. Key cards allowing additional access to the building are provided to pastors, PhD students, and alumni on a case-by-case basis. A book return box outside the seminary building is available for use when the building is closed. The Library Director is available to provide assistance to library patrons during the seminary’s regular hours, and the library clerk is available Monday through Friday from 9:15 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Students, faculty, staff, and visiting library patrons may also contact the library clerk by e-mail outside of these times.

 

Adequacy of Services. The Library Collection Development Policy provides direction concerning the acquisition of new resources. The Library Director and the library clerk regularly seek input from faculty and students concerning desired materials. Resources pertinent to classes offered are routinely added to the NCL collection. Additionally, the library regularly receives donations of books, including large collections from retiring pastors. The Collection Development Policy guides the staff as these donations are sorted for possible Library use.

           

Off-Campus and Distance Learning Access. Students, regardless of location, have access to all of the Library’s holdings via OPAC, as well as the listing of journal items on the Library’s website. These titles are readily available for residential students and the Library makes all such titles accessible to distance learning students upon their request. The Library has aggressively sought to identify and purchase a greater number of E-copy/materials, which are of particular interest to distance learning students. The Library has collected both monographs and serials in E-format and has subscribed to over 800 serial titles in print in both 2013-14 [35] and 2014-15 [36], along with holding many out-of-print journals for research [37]. Table 4 below outlines acquisitions, such as book materials [38], journal resources [39], and online aids [22] that SACSCOC has deemed appropriate [40].

 

For distance learning students, the Library enrolled in ATLA’s pilot program in November 2014 [41] for distance borrowing—ATLA Reciprocal Borrowing Program. Joining another thirty plus institutions around the United States, the Library adopted the Guidelines and Agreement Draft of October 30, 2014, permitting visiting distance students to use the Library while MABTS students received the same privileges to the other reciprocal schools [42]. All Library users within proximity to the Cordova Campus have reciprocal borrowing/user privileges with local institutions enrolled in the MALC cooperative agreement [43].

 

Access to Outside Resources. The NCL is a member of the Capital District Library Council (CDLC), a consortium which includes over twenty academic libraries in addition to public and special libraries. The library faculty and staff may obtain interlibrary loan materials from participating CDLC libraries. Also available to faculty and staff are Direct Access Cards, which may be used to borrow materials directly from over sixty libraries with combined resources of over 7,000,000 books.

 

Relevant Resources for Academic Programming. The NCL’s participation in the CDLC provides links to fellow academic libraries and enables Northeast faculty and staff to take advantage of resources held by those institutions. The library also makes its resources available to the patrons of participating CDLC libraries. The CDLC has guidelines in place to assure accountability concerning the lending and borrowing of materials.   

 

Documentation

         

1. MABTS Website – History of the Library

2. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 48-56

3. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 86-94

4. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 30

5. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 68

6. MABTS Website – Interlibrary Loan

7. MABTS Website – Library Instructional Video

8. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 22-25

9. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 59-63

10. 2014-15 Employee Handbook, p. 31, 57-58

11. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 37

12. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 76

13. 2013-14 Annual Student Survey

14. 2014-15 Annual Student Survey

15. MABTS Website – Library Hours

16. MABTS Website – Students Online Guide to the Library

17. MABTS Website – OPAC

18. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 26

19. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 63

20. MABTS Website – Distance Learning Student’s Guidelines

21. MABTS Website – Library Instructional Video

22. MABTS Website – Online Resources

23. MABTS Website – Collection Development Policy

24. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 72

25. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 69

26. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 73

27. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 69

28. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 74

29. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 30

30. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 68

31. 2013-14 MABTS Annual Student Survey

32. 2014-15 MABTS Annual Student Survey

33. MABTS Fact Book, Pages 48-56

34. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 86-94

35. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 31

36. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 69

37. MABTS Website – Journal Holdings

38. MABTS Website – Catalog

39. MABTS Website – Journals

40. Online Degree Approval Letter from SACSCOC

41. ATLA Reciprocal Borrowing Participation Guidelines and Agreement

42. ATLA Reciprocal Borrowing Online Program

43. Memphis Area Library Council (MALC) Reciprocal Borrowing Agreement

44. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 31

45. 2014-15 MABTS Fact Book, p. 69

46. MABTS Website – Area Library Links

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