Connected Campus

2.8 Faculty

 

The number of full-time faculty members is adequate to support the mission of the institution and to ensure the quality and integrity of each of its academic programs.

 

Upon application for candidacy, an applicant institution demonstrates that it meets the comprehensive standard for faculty qualifications.

 

_X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative

 

The mission statement of Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary (MABTS) serves as a foundation for defining policies concerning faculty. The mission of the institution has direct bearing on the classification, number and type of faculty employed, and the institution employs sufficient faculty to ensure the quality and integrity of all academic programs. The responsibilities of full-time faculty are clearly delineated and serve as a sufficient resource for carrying out faculty function. Adjunct faculty and instructors also serve in carrying out some of these functions. MABTS’s employment policies for part-time or adjunct faculty are clearly demonstrated. Full-time faculty are equally distributed across academic programs (both residential and distance). The number of full-time faculty is equal to or adequate for the teaching load for all degree programs.

 

Faculty Classifications

 

The faculty of MABTS are classified as assistant professor, associate professor, professor, and professor emeritus. These four classifications have full-time faculty rank (F). Those with faculty rank compose the permanent teaching faculty. The trustees have granted faculty status to the Chief Development Officer, the Vice President for Finance and Operations, and the Director of Library Services so that they may attend and vote in faculty meetings. The Northeast branch faculty consists of the Director and faculty members who serve at the Northeast branch. The seminary employs other officers of instruction, who are classified as adjunct instructors (AI) or graduate teaching assistants (GTA). 

 

Part-time faculty are employed for special courses, do not hold faculty status, and are not tenured. They must be adequately credentialed in their fields of teaching by education and experience. They are given a one-year contract that may be renewed, and they may be promoted upon recommendation if seminary requirements are met [1]. 

 

The Number and Type of Faculty

 

The primary purpose of MABTS is to provide undergraduate and graduate theological training for effective service among Southern Baptists in church-related and missions vocations through its main campus and designated branch campuses [2]. Because the seminary is primarily concerned with training students for ministry in Southern Baptist churches and mission work, every faculty member must be:

 

·      an active member of a cooperating Southern Baptist church,

·      a holder of an earned doctorate (diversified, if possible),

·      a faithful witness for Christ,

·      one who holds to a verbal plenary view of inspiration and other specified articles of belief,

·      available for counseling students,

·      one who has a background of fieldwork in the pastorate and/or evangelism and mission service [3].

 

The number of faculty hired, consistent with the mission of MABTS, is the number deemed necessary to maintain an adequate student teacher ratio for effective modeling in and out of the classroom on the part of faculty (see tables 2-5 below).

 

Faculty Responsibilities

 

The seminary employs competent faculty members qualified to accomplish its mission in all degree programs. To achieve this, MABTS’s employment criteria for faculty are based on the SACSCOC criteria for credentials as demonstrated in Comprehensive Standard 3.7.1.

 

The seminary’s faculty credentials meet the SACSCOC criteria and can be examined in the 2014-15 Faculty Roster [4] of all full-time and part-time faculty for the 2014-15 academic year. The 2014-15 Faculty Credentials and Courses also provides details for all instructors, their assigned courses, their college/university degree(s), diplomas, and/or certifications, as well as, where appropriate, coursework, and related work experience. This faculty roster pertains to all degree programs.

 

MABTS clearly identifies the responsibilities of faculty in carrying out their duties in training students for ministry. The responsibilities of faculty are below:

 

·      MABTS faculty must be aware of general information about the seminary, including its history, Purpose Statement, and Articles of Religious Belief [5].

 

·      Professors at MABTS must annually promise and undersign not to inculcate, sanction, teach, or insinuate anything that shall contradict or contravene—either directly or implicitly—any element of the Articles of Religious Belief as outlined in the 2014-15 MABTS Catalog [6].

 

·      Regarding standards of conduct, the faculty assumes the responsibility to conduct themselves in compliance with the objectives and standards of conduct established by the seminary [7].

 

·      All faculty members are to attend the faculty prayer meeting each regular school day at 7:40 a.m. Each full time faculty member is responsible to be present at the seminary Tuesday through Thursday from 7:40 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and Fridays from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. If the faculty member must be away, he/she should notify the Department Chairman and the Academic Vice President [8].

 

·      Each faculty member must submit syllabi for their classes to the Academic VP’s office for review [9].

 

·      Faculty members at MABTS are to teach a normal load of four regular classes per day (twelve semester hours per semester) according to the formula for determining teaching loads [10].

 

·      Seminary responsibilities of faculty members must take precedence over scheduling outside activities such as interim pastorates, supply preaching, mission trips, Bible Conferences, and revivals [11].

 

·      To enhance the seminary’s mission of preparing vocational Christian workers, MABTS faculty members are expected to carry out their duties in a professional, ethical, and collegial manner [12].

 

·      The MABTS faculty is to have direct involvement in all decisions relating to academic affairs through academic committees, faculty committees, and faculty meetings [13].

 

·      MABTS faculty are responsible to serve on various academic committees as deemed necessary by the President [14].

 

·      Academic advising and student counseling is a responsibility for all faculty members [15].

 

·      The administration and faculty are responsible for the development of new academic programs [16].

 

Part-time and adjunct faculty carry out selected functions such as:

 

·      Being aware of general information about the seminary, including its history, Purpose Statement, and Articles of Religious Belief [17].

 

·      Annually promising and undersigning not to inculcate, sanction, teach, or insinuate anything that shall contradict or contravene—either directly or implicitly—any element of the Articles of Religious Belief as outlined in the 2014-15 MABTS Catalog [18].

 

·      Assuming the responsibility to conduct themselves in compliance with the objectives and standards of conduct established by the seminary [19].

 

·      Submitting syllabi for their classes to the Academic VP’s office for review [20].

 

·      Enhancing the seminary’s mission of preparing vocational Christian workers, MABTS adjunct faculty members are expected to carry out their duties in a professional, ethical, and collegial manner [21].

 

Employment Policies for Part-Time and Adjunct Faculty

 

The seminary maintains policies for part-time and adjunct faculty, which delineate their respective responsibilities.

 

Part-time faculty. MABTS provides the full-time faculty to support its educational purpose. The seminary may, however, employ a limited number of part-time faculty when the administration and faculty believe that it will enhance the seminary’s educational effectiveness with specific expertise. The following guidelines govern the employment of part-time faculty:

 

·      Part-time faculty may be recommended by department chairmen, academic directors, and/or the Academic Vice President. All part-time faculty must be approved by the President and the Academic Vice President.

 

·      Part-time faculty must hold a Masters degree for instruction of undergraduate courses or PhD, a ThD, or an EdD from an accredited institution for instruction of master or doctoral level courses.

 

·      Part-time faculty must be in wholehearted agreement with the seminary’s Articles of Religious Belief.

 

·      New part-time faculty will be oriented by the Academic Vice President as to responsibilities, student access, expectations by the seminary, and the evaluation process.

 

·      Part-time faculty work under the supervision of the Academic Vice President and are evaluated regularly by the Academic Vice President  [22].

 

Adjunct faculty. Adjunct faculty are part-time instructional faculty who are paid by the course and who are ineligible for benefits.

 

·      All adjunct faculty must be approved by the Academic Vice president.

 

·      Adjunct faculty who teach courses for credit must hold a Masters degree for instruction of undergraduate courses or PhD, a ThD, or an EdD from an accredited institution for instruction of master or doctoral level courses.

 

·      Adjunct faculty must be in wholehearted agreement with the seminary’s Articles of Religious Belief.

 

·      New adjunct faculty will be oriented by the Academic Vice President as to responsibilities, student access, and expectations by the seminary.

 

·      Adjunct faculty work under the supervision of the departmental chairperson [23].

 

The Distribution of Full-Time Faculty

 

The full-time faculty is adequate to support the mission of the institution and to ensure the quality and integrity of the associate and bachelor programs, the master programs, the doctoral programs, the online associate and bachelor program, and the online master programs [24].

 

Teaching Loads. MABTS offered 108 residential courses in the 2014-15 school year. Of the 108 residential courses, full-time faculty taught 74 classes or 69%, and adjunct instructors or GTAs taught 31% of courses. The seminary offered forty-nine online courses (2014-15), of which 76% were taught by full-time faculty.

 

Table 1 below demonstrates that the teaching load of full-time, part-time, adjunct, and graduate teaching assistants for all programs offered is adequate.

Location of Instruction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number & Percent of Student Undergraduate

Credit Hours Taught by Full-time Faculty for each Major or Program content area

 

 

 

 

 

Number & Percent of Student Undergraduate

Credit Hours Taught by Part-time or Adjuncts or Graduate Teaching Assistants for each Major or Program content area

 

 

Number & Percent of Student Undergraduate Credit Hours Taught by Part-time Faculty or Adjuncts or Graduate Teaching Assistants in General Education Courses

 

 

Number & Percent of Student Graduate Credit Hours Taught by Full-time Faculty in each Degree Program

 

 

 

 

Number & Percent of Student Graduate

Credit Hours Taught by Part-time Faculty or adjuncts in each Degree Program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cordova Campus, Cordova, TN

Shelby County

 

ADiv (60 hrs.)

12 of 20

Classes/

60%

 

ACE (60 hrs.)

12 of 21

Classes/

57%

 

 

BA in Christian Studies (120 hrs.)

 

19 of 43 Classes/

44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADiv

8 of 20 Classes/

40%

 

 

ACE

9 of 21 Classes

43%

 

 

 

BA in Christian Studies

 

24 of 43 Classes/

56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADiv

4 of 7 Classes

57%

 

 

ACE

4 of 7 Classes

57%

 

 

 

BA in Christian Studies

 

13 of 19 Classes/

68%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MDiv (90 hrs.)

34 of 40 Classes/

85%

 

MMICS (90 hrs.)

35 of 41 Classes/

85%

 

MACE (60 hrs.)

27 of 31 Classes/

87%

 

MCE (90 hrs.)

 

30 of 38 Classes/

79%

 

DMin

 

8 of 8 Seminars/

100%

 

PhD

 

18 of 19 Seminars/

95%

 

 

 

 

MDiv

6 of 40 Classes/

15%

 

MMICS

6 of 41 Classes/

15%

 

 

MACE

4 of 31 Classes/

13%

 

MCE

 

8 of 38 Classes/

21%

 

DMin

 

0 of 8 Seminars/

0%

 

PhD

 

1 of 19 Seminars/

5%

 

 

 

 

Northeast Campus, Schenectady, NY

AAS (60 hrs.)

 

13 of 14 Classes/

93%

 

 

AAS

 

1 of 14 Classes/

7%

 

 

AAS

 

0 of 14 Classes/

0%

 

 

MDiv (90 hrs.)

 

21 of 23 Classes/

91%

 

MDiv

 

2 of 23 Classes/

9%

 

Table 1. Teaching Loads

                                                                

Faculty to Student Ratio. The seminary employs a full-time faculty of adequate size to support its mission and to ensure the quality and oversight of the educational programs. A full time department chairman oversees each curricular division and all programs of study have a program dean. Each academic program may utilize every full time faculty member, whether courses are taught as part of the residential program or through distance learning. The faculty information shown includes course loads and faculty credentials for residential and distance programming.

 

The 2014-15 Faculty Roster [4] demonstrates that the seminary employed 20 full time faculty members (F), 16 adjunct instructors (AI), and 4 graduate teaching assistants (GTA) for the entire curriculum. The current enrollment summary indicates that the total number of full time equivalent (FTE) students for both Memphis and New York campuses for the 2014-15 academic year was 268 [25]. The FTE faculty to student ratio was 1:10.8. Table 2 below indicates that for the past five years, the total FTE faculty to student ratio on both the Memphis and New York campuses remained low for all programs. Table 3 indicates that the ratio for the undergraduate program (ADiv/BACS) was also low, and tables 4 and 5 indicate the same for the Master programming and the doctoral programming. 

 

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Academic Year

Ratio

Ratio

Ratio

2011-12

 1:8.6

1:4.1

1:7.58

2012-13

 1:10

1:6.8

1:10

2013-14

 1:12

1:7.6

1:11.8

2014-15

 1:12.2

1:1.75

1:10.8

Table 2. Faculty to Student Ratio 2011-2015 (All Programs)

 

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Academic Year

Ratio

Ratio

Ratio

2011-12

1:9.4

1:1.3

1:7.9

2012-13

 1:10

1:1.7

1:8.1

2013-14

1:12.3

1:1.2

1:9.2

2014-15

1:9.1

1:1.0

1:9.6

Table 3. Faculty to Student Ratio 2011-2015 (Undergraduate Program)

 

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Academic Year

Ratio

Ratio

Ratio

2011-12

1:6.0

1:6.9

1:6.1

2012-13

1:7.4

1:7.1

1:7.2

2013-14

1:8.1

1:4.3

1:6.9

2014-15

1:8.0

1:2.1

1:7.2

Table 4. Faculty to Student Ratio 2011-2015 (Masters Programs)

 

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Academic Year

Ratio

Ratio

Ratio

2011-12

1:6.4

N/A

1:6.4

2012-13

1:5.5

N/A

1:5.5

2013-14

 1:4.4

N/A

1:4.4

2014-15

1:4.7

N/A

1:4.7

Table 5. Faculty to Student Ratio 2011-2015 (Doctoral Program)

 

Class Size. In an effort to promote optimum student learning in all classes, the seminary has made a commitment to smaller class size. Table 6 contains a summary of class rolls for the 2014-15 academic year. This table demonstrates that the average class size cumulatively was 3.63. Individual faculty members of the seminary, working with their department chairmen, determine the class size for each course they teach, thus substantiating faculty participation in setting appropriate class size. Table 7 shows a summary of class rolls for undergraduate programming, and tables 8 and 9 indicate the summary for the master and doctoral programming.

 

Semester

Total Number of Classes Taught

Total Number of Students Enrolled

Average Class Size

1st Semester

95

411

4.33

2nd Semester

93

381

4.09

Other Terms: Mini-Terms/Modular

 

27

 

67

 

2.48

Total

215

859

3.63

Table 6. Summary of Class Rolls 2014-15 (All Programs)

 

Semester

Total Number of Classes Taught

Total Number of Students Enrolled

Average Class Size

1st Semester

35

123

3.51

2nd Semester

34

113

3.32

Other Terms: Mini-Terms/Modular

 

0

 

0

0



Table 7. Summary of Class Rolls 2014-15 (Undergraduate Program)

 

Semester

Total Number of Classes Taught

Total Number of Students Enrolled

Average Class Size

1st Semester

46

111

2.41

2nd Semester

48

100

2.08

Other Terms: Mini-Terms & Modular

 

13

 

 

61

 

 

4.69

 

Table 8. Summary of Class Rolls 2014-15 (Masters Program)

 

Semester

Total Number of Classes Taught

Total Number of Students Enrolled

Average Class Size

1st Semester

7

62

8.85

2nd Semester

7

53

7.57

Other Terms: Mini-Terms & Modular

 

14

 

 

6

 

 

0.428

 

Table 9. Summary of Class Rolls 2014-15 (Doctoral Program)

 

Credit Hours Taught by Full Time Faculty. An important data element when considering the appropriateness of faculty resources is the number of credit hours taught by full time and part time faculty members. The seminary’s full time faculty members teach significantly more credit hours than part time instructors. Table 10 demonstrates that the greater proportion of credit hours was taught by full time faculty. This ensures the quality and integrity of the seminary’s academic programs. The same table shows that 327 credit hours (69%) out of 471 total hours on the Memphis campus were taught by full time faculty for the 2014-15 academic year. The total credit hours taught by full time faculty at the Memphis and New York campuses for the 2014-15 academic year is 447 (74%). Since the bachelor program was inaugurated in 2011-12, table 11 demonstrates the teaching responsibilities of faculty in the Associate of Divinity program and the BACS program for 2014-15. Tables 12 and 13 show credit hours taught by faculty in the master and doctoral programs respectively. 

 

Credit Hours Taught by:

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Full Time

327 Credit Hrs. (69%)

120 Credit Hrs.

(89%)

447 Credit Hrs.

(74%)

Adjunct Instructors

129 Credit Hrs.

(27%)

15 Credit Hrs.

(11 %)

144 Credit Hrs.

(24%)

Graduate Teaching Assistants

15 Credit Hrs.

(4%)

0 Credit Hrs.

(0%)

15 Credit Hrs.

(2%)

Total

471 Credit Hrs.

135 Credit Hrs.

606 Credit Hrs.

Table 10. Distribution of Teaching Responsibilities 2014-15 (All Programs)

 

Credit Hours Taught by:

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Full Time

241

78

319

Adjunct Instructors

26

15

41

Graduate Teaching Assistants

9

0

9

Total

265

93

378

Table 11. Distribution of Teaching Responsibilities 2014-15 (Undergraduate Program)

 

Credit Hours Taught by:

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Full Time

60

39

99

Adjunct Instructors

12

26

38

Graduate Teaching Assistants

3

0

3

Total

87

65

152

Table 12. Distribution of Teaching Responsibilities 2014-15 (Masters Program)

 

Credit Hours Taught by:

Memphis Campus

New York Campus

Total

Full Time

70

0

70

Adjunct Instructors

4

0

4

Graduate Teaching Assistants

0

0

0

Total

78

0

78

Table 13. Distribution of Teaching Responsibilities 2014-15 (Doctoral Program)

 

Faculty Workload

 

The faculty is led by the President and the Academic Vice President who gives direction to the Academic Council, comprising deans of the three academic programs of the seminary. The members of this council, in turn, provide leadership to the different academic departments of the school [26]. A faculty member may have more than one title depending on the level of responsibilities and work he/she is doing for a specific course. For example a faculty member could be a department director and program dean simultaneously. 

 

The 2014-15 Employee Handbook records the following information about academic structure at the seminary [27]. The faculty is directly involved in all decisions relating to academic affairs through the academic committees, faculty committees, and faculty meetings. All curricular changes are presented to the faculty for final approval. The Academic Vice President directs the academic affairs of the seminary under the final authority of the President and the Board of Trustees. He is assisted by three academic deans and their respective academic committees.

 

Academic Council. The Academic Council is composed of the Executive Vice President, the Academic Vice President (chairman), the Dean of the Doctor of Philosophy Program, the Dean of the Doctor of Ministry Program, the Dean of the Masters and the Undergraduate Program, and the Director of Institutional Assessment. The Council meets weekly to assist and advise the Academic Vice President in the supervision of the seminary’s academic programming and development. The Council recommends to the President and to the faculty through the Academic Vice President on academic matters and curriculum development.

 

Program Deans. The Dean of the Doctor of Philosophy program is appointed by the President with the approval of the Board of Trustees. He oversees the Doctor of Philosophy program, all phases of the program, including the planning and study of the Doctor of Philosophy curriculum and the evaluation of expected results. He also provides academic counseling for doctoral students, prepares final budget requests for the PhD program, and makes recommendations for additional library holdings to support the PhD program. He leads the PhD Committee in reviewing and making needed changes in Catalog statements and offerings in the Doctor of Philosophy section.

 

The Dean of the Doctor of Ministry Program is appointed by the President with the approval of the Trustees. He administers the Doctor of Ministry program under the direction of the Chief Academic Officer and serves as Chairman of the Doctor of Ministry Committee. He provides academic counseling, handles staffing with present faculty and/or adjunct faculty approved by the Doctor of Ministry Committee and the Chief Academic Officer, reviews and directs the program in areas of curricular change in consultation with the Academic Vice President, and approves all project/thesis topics. He oversees any modifications in individual student programs, prepares final budget requests for the program, and makes recommendations for additional library holdings to support the Doctor of Ministry Program. The Dean leads the DMin Committee in reviewing and making needed changes in Catalog statements and offerings in the DMin section, and is responsible for recommending promotions and advertising that pertain to the DMin program to the Director of Communications. He brings recommendations to the faculty from the committee and reports on the program.

 

The Dean of the Masters and Undergraduate Programs is appointed by the President with the approval of the Trustees. He administrates the Masters and Undergraduate degree programs under the direction of the Academic Vice President and he serves as chairman of the Masters and Undergraduate Committee. This committee is composed of the chairmen of each academic department. He is responsible for providing academic counseling for students in the Masters and Undergraduate programs. He leads the Masters and Undergraduate Committee in reviewing and making needed changes in Catalog statements and offerings in the Masters and Undergraduate sections. He finalizes budget requests for the Masters and Undergraduate programs. He brings to the faculty recommendations from the Masters and Undergraduate Committee and reports on the programs.

 

Academic Committees. The Doctor of Philosophy Committee is composed of faculty members offering Doctor of Philosophy seminars, the President, the Academic Vice President, and the Dean of the PhD Program. The Committee formulates the plans for Doctor of Philosophy seminars and sets standards for dissertations and examinations. The Committee is responsible for the organization of the Doctor of Philosophy program and fields of specialization. They also guide the seminars and dissertation writing within these fields. The Committee makes the final decision of Doctor of Philosophy examinations and dissertations; however, the full faculty is invited to attend examinations. The Committee serves as the Admissions Committee to the Doctor of Philosophy Program and the Chairman of the Committee brings to the faculty recommendations from the Doctor of Philosophy Committee and reports on the program.

 

The Doctor of Ministry Committee formulates plans for courses and seminars to be offered and sets standards for examination and ministry projects. It serves as the Admissions Committee to the Doctor of Ministry Program, oversees the operation of the program, and evaluates the instruction, performance of the students, ministry projects, and oral examinations. The Dean of the Doctor of Ministry Program is the Chairman of the Doctor of Ministry Committee. Recommendations for major policy changes in the Doctor of Ministry Program are made to the faculty for consideration and approval.

 

The Masters and Undergraduate Committee is chaired by the Dean of the Masters and Undergraduate Programs. The Committee, composed of the Dean of the Masters and Undergraduate Programs and the Chairmen of each academic department of the seminary, advises on all matters concerning the academic programs of the seminary. The Committee serves as the curriculum committee for the Masters and Undergraduate programs, making a continuous study of the academic offerings as listed in the Catalog and reviewing recommendations for the quality of instruction. The Committee also recommends policies for student class loads, conferring of degrees, residence requirements, and other matters relating to the Masters and Undergraduate programs. The Committee serves as the Admissions Committee to the Masters and Undergraduate Program. The Masters and Undergraduate Committee periodically evaluates expected educational results of those programs through the following assessment instruments: course evaluations, alumni evaluations, student body evaluations, and field evaluations. The Masters and Undergraduate Committee receives and reviews department recommendations for budget requests and prepares a final academic budget request for those programs.

 

Departmental Chairmen. Departmental chairmen are responsible for leading in departmental planning. Planning includes departmental curriculum development; course scheduling; periodic evaluations by students, faculty, and alumni; and informing the President of departmental teaching needs through the Masters and Undergraduate Committee, the Doctor of Philosophy Committee, the Doctor of Ministry Committee, and the Academic Vice President.

Responsibilities of departmental chairman include:

 

·      Leading in the preparation of departmental budget requests.

 

·      Leading their department in reviewing and making changes in department statements and curriculum offerings in the Catalog.

 

·      Having a general knowledge of the academic programs of the seminary.

 

·      Demonstrating advisory skills for the undergraduate, masters, and doctoral students.

 

·      Being thoroughly conversant with the seminary’s form and style manual (Turabian 8th edition and the MABTS supplement).

 

·      Being responsible for every PhD student in their department. They are to ensure that the major advisor for a dissertation has given adequate supervision of a student’s dissertation.

 

·      Further, they are to ensure that every member of the department has read the student’s dissertation.

 

·      Being knowledgeable of new literature in the field for the benefit of the department and for recommending new books for the library.

 

·      Demonstrating planning skills for special events (i.e. colloquiums and other special events).

 

·      Chairing regular departmental faculty meetings to provide opportunity for all faculty members to have appropriate input in all areas of departmental planning.

 

Faculty workload is another indicator of adequate faculty resources. The seminary adheres to its policy on determining faculty workloads in all degree programs as demonstrated in table 14. Workload varies dependent upon administrative duties at the school, and administrators carry a reduced teaching load. 

            

Administrative

Courses per Semester

Instructor

Duties

Minimum

Normal

Maximum

Part time

Full time

0

1

1

Full Time

None

3

3

4

Full time

Full time

2

3

3

Adjunct

None

0

1

2

Professor

None

3

4

4

Professor

Limited

2

3

4

Professor

Full time

0

1

1

Table 14. Formula for Teaching/Administrative Loads

 

The responsibilities of full-time faculty are clearly understood and serve as a sufficient resource for carrying out faculty function. MABTS’s employment policies for part-time or adjunct faculty are clearly demonstrated and full-time faculty are equally distributed across academic programs (both residential and distance). The number of full-time faculty is equal to or adequate for the teaching load for all degree programs.

 

Documentation

 

1. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 57

2. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 8-9

3. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 74

4. 2014-15 MABTS Faculty Roster

5. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 8-11

6. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 79

7. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 67

8. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 67

9. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 72-73

10. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 71

11. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 62

12. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 40

13. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 45

14. 2014-15 MABTS Catalog, p. 63-64

15. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 73

16. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 58

17. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 3-4

18. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 105

19. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 54

20. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 88-89

21. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 62

22. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 58

23. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 59

24. 2014-15 MABTS Course Schedules

25. FTE Updated Fall 2014

26. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 40

27. 2014-15 MABTS Employee Handbook, p. 40

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