Connected Campus

Covid-19

Mid-America Campus

Response Update for Covid-19

 

In consultation with the president and trustees, and in accordance with our Public Health Emergency policy, we will suspend residential classes until the end of the Spring 2020 semester due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Please continue attending classes online during this time. We will observe the final examination schedule on the 2019-20 academic calendar.  

 

We are combining Spring and Fall semester graduation exercises. Students graduating in the Spring semester will receive their diplomas by mail and will have the opportunity of attending graduation exercises in December. All graduation fees will remain the same.

 

Doctoral students graduating in the Spring 2020 semester will defend their dissertations via Zoom. The director of doctoral programming will be responsible for coordinating these sessions.

 

Summer 2020 session classes will continue as planned. Remember that the online registration period for summer classes is April 17-May 6.  If you need help with registration, please contact the Registrar (include email or number) or the Business Office (include email or number).

 

If you have any questions or concerns, please email Dr. Brad Thompson at bthompson@mabts.edu.

 


 

Currently, no known cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been detected at Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary (MABTS) or The College at Mid-America (CAMA). However, residents of Tennessee and Memphis have tested positive for the virus. Contracting the virus remains low; however, preventative measures are strongly recommended. 

 

MABTS and CAMA continue to monitor the spread of COVID-19 carefully and are consulting with experts from the Shelby County Health Department. We are committed to your safety, and to making informed decisions based on the latest public health guidelines and emerging information from expert bodies. This page will be updated accordingly.

 

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MABTS Policy

To access the Mid-America Public Health Emergency Policy, click here.

 

Travel and Health Information

The COVID-19 situation continues to evolve with information coming frequently. Travel plans should be flexible and anticipate changes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention might add additional countries and regions to the Level 3 Travel Warning. This means anyone returning from a Level 3 country is likely to be quarantined. As governments impose travel restrictions, you should be prepared for a scenario in which you are not able to leave the country or travel to specific other countries. Because COVID-19 is also spreading throughout the United States, with some states declaring emergencies, you should prepare for additional disruptions in travel and short- or long-range plans. Please use precaution when making travel arrangements and avoid non-essential travel.

If you do travel, take these actions:

 

We strongly recommend you review the CDC’s travel notices. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices

 

Precautions You Should Take (from CDC.gov)

"There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Follow CDC’s recommendations for using a facemask.
    • CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.
    • Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to  others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

For information about handwashing, see CDC’s Handwashing website. For information specific to healthcare, see CDC’s Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings

 

What To Do If You Become Ill (from CDC.gov)

 

"If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.

 

Stay home except to get medical care

  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.
  • Avoid public areas:Do not go to work, school, or public areas.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home

  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus.
  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

Call ahead before visiting your doctor

  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with the person who is sick should not stay in the same room with them, or they should wear a facemask if they enter a room with the person who is sick.

Cover your coughs and sneezes

  • Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Clean your hands often

  • Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water: Soap and water are the best option if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Handwashing Tips

 

Avoid sharing personal household items

  • Do not share: You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday

  • Clean and disinfect: Practice routine cleaning of high touch surfaces.

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.

  • Disinfect areas with bodily fluids: Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
  • Household cleaners: Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.

Complete disinfection guidance

 

Monitor your symptoms

  • Seek medical attention: Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing).
  • Call your doctor: Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19.
  • Wear a facemask when sick: Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed.
  • Alert health department: Ask your healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals, as appropriate."

External Resources

 

CDC Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
CDC Frequently Asked Questions
CDC Webinar: What clinicians need to know to prepare for COVID-19 in the U.S.
World Health Organization Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Outbreak

 

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